Personalized, Online Math Education with CTC Math

Managing the math education of multiple kids is daunting to say the least.  We've curriculum hopped for the past 10 years of homeschooling, always in search of the best program to accommodate the learning styles in front of me.   We'd meandered from program to program, piecing things together, in the attempt to find the perfect fit.  Along the way, I found myself wishing, hoping for a way to keep track of where we'd been and where we were going. 

Enter CTC Math
Exhale deeply. 
Find peace with Math.
 

That's what happened.  As soon as my account was activated, I hopped on to take a peek and I immediately saw how this program could work for all five of my school-age kids (grades k-8). 

{Please Note: I received a CTC Math membership free in order to give a review, and was compensated for my time.  I was not, however, required to give a positive review, and all opinions are my own.}

CTC Math Tech Savvy Visual Learner

The Tech-Savvy or Visual Learner

My 14 year old loves working online.  He finds videos extremely helpful when he wants to learn something new.  So CTC was a perfect fit for him.  The videos included in each lesson are straight-forward, yet thorough, providing several examples of the concept being taught.  Listening to the instructor while watching the math unfold on the screen is really effective for the visual learner that he is.  If he feels he needs to hear an explanation again, he simply replays that portion of the video.  When he's ready, he moves on to the problems. 


The Gets-Bored-Easily Learner

My 12 year old definitely lives by the motto "variety is the spice of life" and she approaches math the same way.  She prefers to learn from a variety of sources and styles.  CTC Math is the perfect addition to her math menu.  When she needs a break from the books, we hop online and find which CTC lessons will support what she is learning.  The program makes this so easy!  It is searchable and completely customizable.  While some programs allow access to only one grade level, CTC allows a student to work at multiple levels, creating a completely personalized math education. 

CTC Math Visual Learner

The Independent Learner

There are 2 ways to access the lessons in CTC Math.  The parent/teacher can assign tasks for the student to work through or the student can work through lessons of his choosing.  Either of these can be done following the scope and sequence of the program or in any order necessary.  These features allow the individual needs of the learner to be met while still providing a space for independent learning.  My 8 year old was on a roll with multiplication.  Instead of having to stop at what would have been the end on the second grade curriculum, he was able to roll along into the higher levels, all on his own.  I simply showed him how to search for multiplication lessons and sent him on his way.


The No-Nonsense Learner

If you have a student who is easily overwhelmed by busy workbook page or one who likes to just get it done, CTC Math is simple and straight-forward, providing an effective balance of instruction and practice.  The videos are uncluttered, without any unnecessary music or drawings.  The practice problems are follow the same simplicity, one problem at a time with immediate feedback as to the accuracy of the answer.  This is a powerful feature for students who learn best without extra stimuli, allowing them to focus wholly on that one problem without distraction.  It also helps to move things along for the "get 'er done" learner. 

CTC Math Confidence Building

The Confidence-Building Learner

We've all got one of these at some point or another.  The learner who needs to build up some confidence with a specific math concept or with math in general.  My ten year old is one of these learners right now.  He benefits from a hands-on approach and I was skeptical that I would find an online program that would meet this need. But CTC did!  As he reviewed place value, he was able to manipulate base ten blocks with a right-click of the mouse.  When he practiced rounding, a notoriously tricky concept, CTC provided a number line to bring the skill from the abstract to the concrete.  And because it was all online, my felt more "grown-up" while he practiced the concepts that tripped him up earlier in the year.  I was thankful that CTC provided him with the opportunity to review without feeling condescending or babyish, helping him to make progress without feeling like he was completing remedial work.  CTC provides an unlimited amount of time to work on each problem.  Nothing destroys confidence more unnecessarily than not completing a problem "in time."  The fluency will come as the confidence increases.  CTC builds confidence!
 

CTC Math meets the needs of all of us!

CTC Math family

Not only does CTC Math meet the individual needs of my kids, but it meets mine too.  It is easy to use and allows me to customize a week's worth (or more) of math instruction for multiple kids in a short amount of time.  I can hop on at any time to see their progress or edit their assignments.  For our family this is a win multiple times over.  Each child can use CTC Math as it best fits their needs and I can facilitate that with ease. 

Want to see how well CTC Math can work for your family?  Try it FREE for 4 weeks! 

Once you fall in love with it, save 60% off the homeschoolers price and get 6 extra months FREE!  That's a year and a half of personalized math instruction!

An Accidental, Mathematical, Poetical Teatime

“That’s my parawewogram!”

“No, it’s mine!  See?!”

“Oh, yeah. {giggle} Mine is hidin’ under the poetwy book.”  {giggle, giggle}

They’re arguing over a parallelogram?  They’re arguing over a parallelogram!  Woohoo!  This is big news!  Not the arguing.  That happens everyday. But the fact that these little ones even care about parallelograms at all. That’s the best news of the week. 

But I must confess, I didn’t teach them this.  It wasn’t some heroic effort on my part that blessed them with the knowledge of the parallelogram.  If anything, it was because I was lazy! 

You see, I’ve got six kids ranging in age from three to thirteen, and sometimes homeschooling all of them just overwhelms me.  Keeping up with six unique learners takes everything that this introverted mama has.  Sometimes I just run out of juice.  Do you know what I mean?  Have you ever felt that way?  That’s what happened on the parallelogram morning.

Every lesson doesn’t need to be laid out in the plan book.  The best learning happens, often by accident, when good things come together to create a spark of connection.  That’s what I learned on the parallelogram morning.

I woke up late, scrambling into the morning.  The list of learning activities I had planned for the day would require much more time than my late start would allow.  As I poured a strong cup of tea and dolloped it with honey, my phone dinged.  Another reminder from the library.  “That whole stack of books you took out.  They’re due. Yesterday.” 

In the first five minutes of my morning, I was greeted with all the balls I’d dropped.  Late library books, late nights and late mornings.  Late.  Late.  Late. 

I cheered myself with a few bites of chocolate while I piled the books onto the kitchen table - mostly math themed poetry books I’d been using to plan a co-op class.  I’ve homeschooled long enough to know that this day was headed one of two ways: into the nothing-goes-right kind of day or into the let’s-make-the-most-of-it-and-see-what-happens kind of day.  The choice was mine. 

Seeing those math books stacked up, knowing we needed to make the most of our morning, I grasped forinspiration.  Thankfully, I found a thread of it and held on tight.  We’ll do math and poetry together, all together. 

That’s when a little bit of magic happened.  At least that’s how I prefer to see the chaos that followed. 

Tangrams were dug out of the back of the closet.  Muffins baked in the oven, dangerously close to burning, while pages spewed from my printer onto the floor.  The geometric coloring sheets I’d bookmarked the week before were saving my day. 

In the midst of all this distraction I heard, “That’s my parawewogram!”

It stopped me in my tracks.  I braced for the argument that I expected to come.  And then melted as the exchanged played out.  My kids were learning from each other simply because I was lazy and hit the snooze button.  Simply because I had chosen a let’s-make-the-most-of-it-and-see-what-happens kind of day.  Simply because there was a spark of connection between my children and the engaging materials which were sitting way-too-close to a puddle of almond milk on the kitchen table.  Learning was happening despite my scatteredness. 

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One by one children found their places around the table, lured by the smell of cinnamon.  One by one, they picked up colored pencils and tangrams, rulers and poetry books.  Mathematical riddles, disguised as poems, were passed around along with warm muffins.  Belly laughs and quiet moments of concentration took turns dancing through our kitchen.  Our morning, though late to start, was long in the best sort of way. 

Math and poetry had accidentally collided.  And for that, I have to thank the snooze button. 

Want your own mathematical, poetical teatime? 
I’ve got the tools for you listed below.

 


The Stack of Overdue Library Books ( plus a few favorites)

The Best of Times, Gregory Tang
Edgar Allan Poe’s Pie, J. Patrick Lewis
Marvelous Math, Lee Bennett Hopkins
Math Curse, Jon Scieszka
Math Talk: Mathematical Ideas in Poems for Two Voices, Theoni Pappas
The Grapes of Math, Greg Tang
Math for All Seasons, Greg Tang

Our Favorite Math "Toys"

I love to "accidentally" leave math manipulatives and games out on the kitchen table.  My early risers find them there and dig into some before dawn learning.  As the rest of the crew wakes and meanders into the living room, games are underway.    They made a great addition to our poetry teatime too!

The Geometric Coloring Designs

These coloring pages are open-ended and created a lot of math-focused discussion at the level of each child.  We talked about patterns, angles, similarities and differences in shapes and lots more.

 

What are your favorite ways to sneak some math into your day?  Share in the comments!